QuadBlogging Video

QuadBlogging is something I have blogged about here earlier this year.

The term QuadBlogging was coined by David Mitchell.

The concept: four blogging classes come together and learn about one another one week at a time. Each week a different blog in the quad is the focus and the other three classes take the time to visit and comment on their blog.

Earlier this year, Linda Yollis, Jonah Salsich, Judy McKenzie, Kelly Jordan and I all decided we’d make our own quad.

*Mrs. Yollis’ Classroom Blog, California, U.S.A.*
*Open the Door to B-4  in New Zealand*
*Mr. Salsich Class Blog, Connecticut, U.S.A*
*2KM and 2KJ  in Australia *

This works really well and we wanted to share the message with other classes. Teachers and students from all four classes got together recently to collaborate on a video about QuadBlogging. We used the tool Sliderocket which was easy to use and effective.

Thanks to Linda Yollis who put the final product together!


Visit http://quadblogging.net/ for more information and to become part of a quad.

Benefits of Educational Blogging Video

The benefits of educational blogging is something I have discussed many times on this blog.

Kelly Jordan and I regularly speak to teachers at our school and around the world about blogging. Rather than us always selling the benefits we decided to make this video with our students to highlight some of the advantages of having a class blog.

The video goes for 15 minutes. We hope you enjoy it.

RSA Animate – Changing Education Paradigms

Last year, Sir Ken Robinson was awarded the Benjamin Franklin Medal by the Royal Society of Arts in London. Accepting the award, he gave a talk on Changing Paradigms in Education.  The RSA has produced a animated version of highlights of the talk.

This is a video I had heard about on Twitter and on the Ed Tech Crew podcast. When I finally put aside 12 minutes to watch it I thought it was definitely worth sharing for two reasons.

1. The ideas that Sir Ken express in the talk about change in education are very much food for thought.

2. The actual animation in itself is very interesting. Perhaps this is a style of animation that students could work on. It would be a terrific way to express creativity and could be used to animate any sort of speech, explanation, debate etc.

Leave a comment.

What did you get out of Ken Robinson’s talk?

What did you think of the animation?