Creative Commons Infographic

I’ve long been aware that many people don’t realise that you can’t use just any image off the internet for your own purposes.

Many of my students join my class with the habit of reproducing Google Images strongly ingrained. This habit is often either taught or not questioned by parents or previous teachers.

I also find that many people who use any online image think that “attributing” with a link to the source makes it acceptable. Little do they know, all creative work a person makes is copyright unless stated otherwise. Linking to the source doesn’t change this fact.

There seems to be another group of people who know it’s not right to reproduce any online image in their work, but do this as they don’t know how to source and attribute Creative Commons images.

Despite having a lot of anecdotal experience of others not knowing about Creative Commons, I was surprised to read that more than 90% of Creative Commons images are not attributed at all and more than 99% are not adequately attributed.

This shows that even people trying to do the right thing with Creative Commons images often aren’t. I’m certain I’ve been guilty of this in the past.

With more and more people becoming producers rather than consumers of the internet, I find this general lack of knowledge concerning. For that reason, I try to teach students the correct way to source and attribute images for their blog posts and published work. This guide to Using Creative Commons Images in Blog Posts is just one resource I’ve created for teaching about Creative Commons.

I recently came across this excellent infographic on Twitter via @suewaters and @joycevalenza. I think it’s something all educators would benefit from taking a look at! It certainly refreshed my own understanding.

Click on the image to view a larger version.

Creative Commons Photos

How To Attribute Creative Commons Photos by Foter

Educators might also find this guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons by Ronnie Burt useful in upskilling themselves.

What other advice or resources could you suggest for teaching or learning about Creative Commons?

Internet Safety Posters

I recently wrote three posts around the issues of internet use and cyber safety.

10 Internet Safety Tips for Students

10 Internet Use Tips for Teachers

10 Internet Safety Tips for Parents

I have transferred the information in these posts into a set of posters which might make a useful display or handout. Feel free to download or print them for your own educational use.

10 Internet SafetyTips for Students Poster November 2012

 

10 Internet Use Tips for Teachers Poster November 2012

 

10 Internet Safety Tips for Parents Poster November 2012

If you’re having trouble downloading the Scribd documents, you can find the PDF versions below.

10 Internet SafetyTips for Students Poster November 2012

10 Internet Use Tips for Teachers Poster November 2012

10 Internet Safety Tips for Parents Poster November 2012

Good luck!

Tips and Topics for Student Bloggers

Recently, I wrote two posts about quality student blogs. You can find them here and here. I have also written a guide to setting up student blogs here.

A new group of students in my class are almost ready to earn their own blogs. I wanted to compile the tips I offer my students in one document for my new bloggers.

Below is a poster with tips for student bloggers. Feel free to download it if it will be helpful in your own classroom (Tip – click on the Scribd button to download or print).

I have also made a document with 20 ideas for blog post topics. I’ve found after a few posts, many students get “bloggers block” and need new inspiration. Hopefully this document will help my students and yours.

Do you have any tips to add to the poster?

What other ideas for student blog post topics could you offer?

Troubleshooting Computer Problems

I am a big advocate of training my students to become as independent as possible with technology. Many technology users can get bogged down with “technical issues” which can take away from the benefits of using the tools.

As I have written about before here and here, I try to make my use of ICT explicit to my Grade Two students. While teaching incidental skills, rather than simply instructing, I like to ask the students what they think we should do. I believe that confident users of ICT use their intuition a lot and this is something I want to develop in my students.

With the addition of 20 new netbooks to our classroom, the need for students to be able to troubleshoot their own problems has increased.

I recently made this poster to remind students of the troubleshooting skills we have discussed incidentally.

After going through the poster with the students, it is displayed in various places in the classroom as a constant reminder of how to troubleshoot common computer problems.

For a little bit of humour, I love this cartoon that Kim Confino once published in a blog post.

tech_support_cheat_sheet

What other troubleshooting tips could you add?

How do you teach your students to troubleshoot?