How Has Teaching Changed?

If you’re a teacher who is trying to encourage other staff to use ICT, you have probably heard this before?

When do I have the time to learn about this?

Learning through Twitter, blogs, online conferences etc is just part of my day-to-day life as I have described in this post. This is extremely foreign to many teachers.

I began teaching in 2004. Today I had a conversation with someone who began teaching in 1984 who explained that for the first fifteen or so years of his career, there was no professional development. It was a common belief that teachers already knew everything. Work at home involved correction; not the sort of professional learning I engage in these days.

I have the feeling there was a belief in the past that taking work home to correct was a sign of a good teacher?

Today I see a commitment to lifelong learning, professional reading and collaboration as the sign of good teaching (among many many other things!)

While I don’t discredit correction, I prefer to do it as the students are working so they are involved in the process and get immediate feedback. A perfectly organised, complete and corrected exercise book does not strike me as evidence of ideal teaching and learning in 2010.

Something just clicked today that made me think that teaching has changed. Some teachers have made this change well and others have not.

How do we help teachers realise that an investment in self-motivated learning is now unavoidable if you want to provide the best possible 21st Century education for your students?

How do we help them leave their baskets of workbooks at school and say hello to someone in Twitter, read a blog or dabble with a web 2.0 tool?

teaching

Image: ‘AHO0711-003 Ingrid Alice wearing a Mariusgenser’
AHO0711-003 Ingrid Alice wearing a Mariusgenser
Image: ‘Flat Classroom Skype’
http://www.flickr.com/photos/8107002@N03/3122642792

Please leave a comment with your thoughts!

RSA Animate – Changing Education Paradigms

Last year, Sir Ken Robinson was awarded the Benjamin Franklin Medal by the Royal Society of Arts in London. Accepting the award, he gave a talk on Changing Paradigms in Education.  The RSA has produced a animated version of highlights of the talk.

This is a video I had heard about on Twitter and on the Ed Tech Crew podcast. When I finally put aside 12 minutes to watch it I thought it was definitely worth sharing for two reasons.

1. The ideas that Sir Ken express in the talk about change in education are very much food for thought.

2. The actual animation in itself is very interesting. Perhaps this is a style of animation that students could work on. It would be a terrific way to express creativity and could be used to animate any sort of speech, explanation, debate etc.

Leave a comment.

What did you get out of Ken Robinson’s talk?

What did you think of the animation?