Creative Commons Infographic

I’ve long been aware that many people don’t realise that you can’t use just any image off the internet for your own purposes.

Many of my students join my class with the habit of reproducing Google Images strongly ingrained. This habit is often either taught or not questioned by parents or previous teachers.

I also find that many people who use any online image think that “attributing” with a link to the source makes it acceptable. Little do they know, all creative work a person makes is copyright unless stated otherwise. Linking to the source doesn’t change this fact.

There seems to be another group of people who know it’s not right to reproduce any online image in their work, but do this as they don’t know how to source and attribute Creative Commons images.

Despite having a lot of anecdotal experience of others not knowing about Creative Commons, I was surprised to read that more than 90% of Creative Commons images are not attributed at all and more than 99% are not adequately attributed.

This shows that even people trying to do the right thing with Creative Commons images often aren’t. I’m certain I’ve been guilty of this in the past.

With more and more people becoming producers rather than consumers of the internet, I find this general lack of knowledge concerning. For that reason, I try to teach students the correct way to source and attribute images for their blog posts and published work. This guide to Using Creative Commons Images in Blog Posts is just one resource I’ve created for teaching about Creative Commons.

I recently came across this excellent infographic on Twitter via @suewaters and @joycevalenza. I think it’s something all educators would benefit from taking a look at! It certainly refreshed my own understanding.

Click on the image to view a larger version.

Creative Commons Photos

How To Attribute Creative Commons Photos by Foter

Educators might also find this guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons by Ronnie Burt useful in upskilling themselves.

What other advice or resources could you suggest for teaching or learning about Creative Commons?

Instructions for Using Creative Commons Images in Blog Posts

Many bloggers are not aware that you can’t just use any images off the internet in your blog posts. Not only is this ethically incorrect but you could leave yourself open to copyright infringement.

I teach my student bloggers to “do the right thing” by using their own images or Creative Commons images in their blog posts.

Wanting to make this process clear to my student bloggers, I created a document explaining copyright, copyright infringement and Creative Commons. The guide provides step-by-step instructions on how to use FlickrCC and Wikimedia Commons to upload and attribute images in blog posts. Obviously, there is more than one way to do this, however, I wanted to keep the instructions as straightforward as posssible for my students.

I have embedded this document below. Feel free to use it with your students to teach them about these important blogging habits.

Using Creative Commons Images From FlickrCC and Wikimedia Commons in Blog Posts

If you are having trouble viewing the document, you can download it here as a PDF. Using Creative Commons Images from FlickrCC and Wikimedia Commons in Blog Posts

More detailed advice on using Creative Commons images in blog posts can be found in the Teacher Challenge guide by Sue Waters.

How do you go about using Creative Commons images?

Do you have any more advice?

Student Blogging and Internet Images

A few weeks ago I set up blogs for two of my most enthusiastic student bloggers, Rhiannon and Bianca. I chose these students as they regularly left comments on our 2KM class blog and were committed to learning as much as they can about blogging.

After gaining their parents’ permission, I set their blogs up, adding myself as an administrator. I had a discussion with Rhiannon and Bianca about what they’re going to blog about and how often they’ll post. We then revised the features of quality posts as well as revising the cyber safety and netiquette guidelines they were already familiar with.

After some initial familiarisation sessions my students were off and it didn’t take them long to learn the basics of blogging.

Click here to check out Rhiannon’s blog.

Click here to check out Bianca’s blog.

Before long, my students were keen to use images off the internet to enhance their posts.

This was a dilemma for me. While my students are only in Grade Two and I don’t want to make blogging too complex for them, I knew that I would have to delve into the topic of copyright and Creative Commons to help my students develop good blogging habits.

Little do many people know, you can’t just use any images off the internet in your blog posts. Not only is this ethically incorrect but you could leave yourself open to copyright infringement.

Wanting to make this process clear to my students, I typed up a document explaining copyright, copyright infringement and Creative Commons while also offering step-by-step instructions on how to use FlickrCC to upload and attribute images in blog posts. Obviously, there is more than one way to do this but given the age of my students, I wanted to keep things as straightforward as posssible.

Below I have embedded this document. Feel free to use it with your students to teach them about these important blogging habits (note: the instructions for uploading the image to a blog post apply to Edublogs blogs).

Note – guide updated to include Wikimedia Commons instructions 20th August 2012
Using Creative Commons Images From FlickrCC and Wikimedia Commons in Blog Posts

One of the things I love about teaching seven and eight year olds is that I can teach them about issues such as copyright, cyber safety, netiquette, social networking etc just before they reach the age where they would dive into these areas, prepared or not. I feel like I can make an impact in setting my students on the right path for their futures.

I am constantly amazed at how my students respond when I challenge them and engage them with ICT and their results across the board never fail to impress me. Set your standards high, provide the structure and the support that your students need to scaffold their learning and reap the rewards!

Will the how-to document be useful for you and your students?

Do you have any questions about blogging or using internet images?

What results have you seen from using ICT and setting high standards for your students?